Sacred Medical Works

One of the most extraordinary works in the history of medical literature – one that should be known to every physician, neuroscientist, psychiatrist, and student of human nature – the Hippocratic Corpus comes from a collection of medical works first assembled in the ancient library at Alexandria and ascribed to the greatest physician of ancient times, Hippocrates of Cos.

What we know of the life of the Founder of Christianity and how much He did for the ailing poor would will lead us to conclude that the religion that He established would foster the care and the cure of future suffering humanity. As I outline in our books,the first works of Christian service was organized care for the sick.  History records that the first hospitals were Christian, and is a conspicuous mark upon the landscape of humanity. Historical records are rich with medical practices, discoveries and healing traditions from diverse civilizations, including the Greeks, the Romans, the Essenes, the Therapeutae, the Arabs, the Chinese, the Hindus, and the Native Americans, to name just a few. These cultures even produced healing temples, spas, and clinics. But the record of antiquity prior to and apart from the influence of Christianity is astonishingly vacant when it comes to the hospital as we know it today.

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The early Christian and medieval age is probably the most difficult period of medical history to understand properly, but it is worth while taking the trouble to follow out the thread of medical tradition from the Greeks to the Jews, Christians, and Arabs, and how the Renaissance medical writers began modern medicine as we now know it today. 

Distinguished Christian writers and scholars, and the Fathers of the Church in the early centuries paid much attention to medical care. In monastic medicine, diagnosis and the taxonomy of illness were central. Diagnosis in the medieval literature was called discernment (diakrisis). Discernment was to differentiate an illness caused by demons or one caused by natural elements. Discernment also was important to identify malingers who would pretend illness in order to receive food and shelter.

The rise of modern medicine is associated with the Renaissance period. The scientific revolution got underway with the gutenburg press and the Protestant Reformation. Following came advances in chemistry and pharmacy, paralleling advances in anatomy and physiology. We hold all these advances sacred. Medicine at its best, has been largely advanced by Christian ideals. However, we do not slight Jewish, Arabic, Persian, and Oriental contributions.

The Order is compiling and digitzing a large reference library for availablity to its members.

Distinguished Christian writers and scholars, and the Fathers of the Church in the early centuries paid much attention to medical care. In monastic medicine, humoralism, diagnosis and the taxonomy of illness were central. Diagnosis in the medieval literature was called discernment (diakrisis). Discernment was to differentiate an illness caused by demons or one caused by natural elements. Discernment also was important to identify malingers who would pretend illness in order to receive food and shelter. The rise of modern medicine is associated with the Renaissance period. The scientific revolution got underway with the Gutenberg press and the Protestant Reformation. Following came advances in chemistry, physics, and pharmacy, paralleling advances in anatomy and physiology. We hold all these advances sacred. Medicine at its best, has been largely advanced by Christian ideals. However, we do not slight Jewish, Arabic, Persian, Indigenous, and Oriental contributions. Further, with the rise of elemental chemistry, atomism, there was an academic battle occurring in both physics and chemistry regarding the topics of vitalism and aether. The proponents of vitalism held that "living organisms are fundamentally different from non-living entities because they contain some non-physical element or are governed by different principles than are inanimate things". Vitalism explicitly invokes a vital principle, that element is often referred to as the "vital spark", "energy" or "élan vital", which was advocated by the followers of Homeopathy and Mesmer’s animal magnetism, admittedly a huge block of medical practitioners. In the 18th and 19th centuries vitalism was discussed among biologists, between those who felt that the known mechanics of physics and atomism, that nature consists of two fundamental principles: atoms and void; would eventually explain the difference between life and non-life and vitalists who argued that the processes of life could not be reduced to these mechanistic processes. Wöhler synthesis, the conversion of inorganic ammonium cyanate into the animal excreta of urea, sparked the downfall of the theory of vitalism, which states that organic matter possessed a certain vital force common to all living things. Prior to the Wöhler synthesis, the work of John Dalton and Jöns Jacob Berzelius had already convinced chemists that organic and inorganic matter obey the same chemical laws. It took until 1845 when Kolbe reported another inorganic – organic conversion (of carbon disulfide to acetic acid) before vitalism started to lose academic support. A 2000 survey found that 90% of chemical textbooks repeat some version of the Wöhler myth. The difference in alchemy and emerging “chemistry” was the understood fundament of all matter – aether: ("luminiferous", meaning "light-bearing") was the working medium of Faraday, Thomson, Steinmetz, Tesla, and many others for the propagation of light, and further, all electromagnetic phenomenon. It was the ancient natural philosophy invoked to explain the ability of wave-based light to propagate through so-called empty space, something that all waves do. Thus, the light of aether, is the analog to sound of air. The assumption of a spatial plenum of luminiferous aether, or the Sea of Dirac, Sea of Moray, or Tesla’s electric ether, rather than Einstein’s spatial vacuum, provided the theoretical medium that was required by all wave theories of light.

The aether hypothesis was the topic of considerable debate throughout its history, as it required the existence of an invisible and infinite material with no interaction with physical objects. As the nature of light was explored, especially in the 19th century, the physical qualities required of an aether became increasingly contradictory. By the late 1800s, the existence of the aether was being questioned, although there was no physical theory to replace it. The negative, s-think, outcome of the Michelson–Morley experiment (1887) suggested that the aether did not exist, a finding that was hotly debated in subsequent experiments throughout the 1920s. This led to considerable coverup to explain the propagation of light without an aether, relying on imaginative mathematical theories rather than practical inventions like that of Tesla and others. The proclaimed major breakthrough was the theory of relativity, which could explain why the experiment failed to see aether, was broadly interpreted to suggest that it did not exist. A parallel finding was earlier advanced to disclaim Mesmer’s animal magnetism, and the unrefuted results of healing on tens of thousands of patients, was simply the result of “imagination.” Thesewidely proclaimed experiments, while suppressing parallel findings of others using aether as the working fundament, were key experiments and trials in the academic development of modern physics, chemistry, and medicine, which now includedvacuous relativity, imaginations, and mathematics, that lead to the downfall of vitalism, ether physics, anti-gravity, free energy, and other extraordinary developments of the early 20th century. Effectively, medicine has suffered more than one hundred years of suppressions and moral violations. In the wake of academic science, the Church abandoned medicine nearly altogether, and we are now only witnessing a slow return seen in the form of “complementary-alternative medicine [CAM].” The fact remains, aether theory, was part of humoral medicine, and was never an “alternative.” Great minds like Hahnemann, Mesmer, Tesla, Koch, Reich, Burr, and a litany of others were advancing medicine, not based on abstract mathematical theories, but on hard clinical evidence, that in many cases was violently attacked. Although these works have largely remained in public domain, yet they have not been organized into a structured learning format for doctors, gleaning and presenting the core secrets to unlocking their treasures. We point to the fundaments, vitalism and aether theory, as the core alchemical basis, just as the Bohr model, a small, dense nucleus surrounded by orbiting electrons—similar to the structure of the Solar System; remains that of hard chemistry. The greatest electrical genius of all times, who lit up the world with light, Nicola Tesla, insisted on “ether” in his rare Columbia College lecture of 1891: “What is electricity, and what is magnetism?”… We are now confident that electric and magnetic phenomena are attributable to ether, and we are perhaps justified in saying that the effects of static electricity are the effects of ether in motion… We know that it acts as an incompressible fluid… the electromagnetic theory of light and all facts observed teach us that electric and ether phenomena are identical.” It has remained for the thinkers to back track these lost and suppressed treasures, to bring aether theoryback to light. It is core to understanding vitalism, and thus all forms of sanctified healing both ancient and modern, oriental and occidental, shamanic and humoral, etc. The Order is compiling and digitizing a large reference library for availability to its members. As part of our educational program, we have prepared a course and textbook: SANCTIFIED HEALING, as part of our missionary and clerical programs. We are also now constructing a huge video and audio library of rare and old documentaries, seminars, recordings, etc. that will be found within the links of our digital, monastic library, online freely available to all members for research and posterity.

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